Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Rosewarne

Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Postby Rosewarne » Fri Nov 18, 2016 1:29 am

Rosewarne’s Stumped Player Guide

Version 1.1 November 2016


Introduction

This guide is written for managers who are new to the game although perhaps some more experienced managers might still benefit from reading it. Hopefully the game will continue to evolve. Because of this it’s likely that this guide will require amendment in the future. The information in this guide is still relevant at the time it was written, hopefully as you read it, it remains so.


Initial Steps

You’ve signed up and you have your team. Perhaps it has a clever name, let’s hope so. What’s next? The answer is, nothing stupid. Do not increase the size of your ground. Do not make any big player purchases.

Your first order of business is to set up your back of house staff. These include your groundsman and your coaches. This is most important because the decisions made about your ground will impact the overall match strategy and in some cases the development of your team. The coaches selected will determine how effectively your players improve.


The Ground and the Pitch

Right off the bat your team does not need a groundsman. It is important to recognise though that a groundsman can be advantageous and not having a groundsman will compel your team to adopt a certain style of play. To better understand this we must understand how different pitches and conditions effect game play.

The more worn a pitch is, the more difficult it is to bat on and that is regardless of the other characteristics of the pitch. The batting difficulty is also impacted on by the pitches moisture and bounce.

As a general rule the moister, or greener, a pitch is the more help there is for seam bowlers and for this reason a greener pitch is often more difficult to bat on. A dryer deck is much more conducive to batting although spin bowlers are usually more effective on a dryer pitch.

In terms of bounce it’s much less clear cut. Less bounce usually helps the batsmen as both seamers and spinners benefit from bounce. However, a green pitch with little bounce is ideal for medium pacers. A dry, low bouncing pitch is a ‘road’ and despite the spinners being able to general a little turn it’s usually a batsmen’s paradise.

If you elect not to employ a groundsman and or covers your pitch’s condition will be at the mercy of the weather. If it’s cold and rainy your pitch will become greener. If it’s hot it will become dryer and probably gain some bounce. Your pitch will always be more worn as no one is maintaining it and for that reason it will usually be tougher to bat on.

A tough batting wicket often results in a shorter ‘shoot out’ style of game where the team that manages to put together just one effective partnership wins. The shorter game can reduce the training your players receive for playing the match and this can hamper their development. That in turn can hamper your teams long term prospects.

If your planning on preparing a pitch that’s friendly to the bowlers then employing a groundsman can usually wait, if not then it’s priority. Speaking from experience it’s certainly beneficial to be able to tailor your wicket to suite your teams style of play. In some instances, it can be useful to prepare a pitch which negates your oppositions game style.

These are all solid reason to hire a groundsman and on balance I’d advise new managers to do just that. It’s uncommon at this time to find groundsmen on the transfer market. This is because groundsman can be created when managers elect to convert one of their older players into a groundsman. The player must be older that thirty to convert them.

When selecting a groundsman, you should first examine your playing squad. You’re looking for a player who’s older than thirty who will not make your first eleven. In fact, you’re looking for the least talented player who is above thirty. Select the player and convert him to a groundsman.

Lastly you should consider training your groundsman and or purchasing covers. As a general rule a little training is good but it soon becomes expensive both in terms of the cost of the training and the increased wages paid to the groundsman.

Covers further protect your wicket from the weather. When deciding if your team wants covers many of the same factors which determine whether you immediately hire a groundsman are at play. As a general rule covers will result in your pitch being easier to bat on. For this reason, if your happy to play matches where the wickets tumble and it’s a bit of a shoot-out then covers can wait. If on the other hand you’d rather prepare pitches which favour batsmen covers should be purchased once you have established your first team and your finances are stable enough to facilitate their purchase.


The Coaches

Now that your ground is sorted step two is to select your coaches. Each team can have as many coaches as they like but only three can be active during any one week. If a coach is training a player or engaging in training themselves, they are active. Due to this limitation it is pointless to have more than three coaches.

Coaches are created in the same way as ground staff are. When coaches are created they will have a basic skill level in each of the four coaching areas. There has been some discussion amongst coaches as to how a new coaches starting skill level is determined. Some have suggested that a more skilled and or experienced player will begin with a higher level of skill in the coaching area which corresponds to his playing skills. At this stage there has been no evidence to suggest that is the case.

Each manager should peruse their player list and convert any players who are thirty and over to coaches. Select the three coaches with the highest overall level of skill, these will be your coaches. Any coaches in excess of three should be sold on the transfer market. If they do not sell simply fire them.

There may be some initial confusion around which coaches should be kept. If there is doubt a good initial selection method is to select one coach with the highest bowling skill, one with the highest batting skill and the last coach could have the highest fielding skill.

Lastly if you are unable to create three coaches from your existing squad then you will need to search the transfer market. Look for players who are thirty or older. I’d be reticent to pay more than ten thousand for any one player.


Selecting Trainees

Unsurprisingly, you can be an administrative genius but if your players aren’t very talented then results will likely be frustrating. When reviewing your initial playing list it is important to identify which, if any, of your existing players might actually develop into a useful long term player. In order to make this judgement new players must first understand what constitutes a good player.

On the forums you will often hear more experienced coaches discuss player potential in terms of numbers. For example, ‘I have a (44) wrist spinner’. The number is generated by adding all three of the player’s relevant statistics together. For bowlers the three stats are accuracy, movement and variation. For batsmen it’s shot selection, defence and attack. So if I had a batsman with a potential shot selection of 12, defence of 15 and attack of 14 that player would be a (41) player.

Any player whose relevant potential skills combined rate at less than 37 is not worth persisting with. Players between 37 and 43 will be useful initial players but will struggle in the higher grades. Players between 44 and 49 are good players who will succeed if used appropriately at higher grades. Any player above fifty is rare and usually a freak talent and as such is very uncommon.

With regards to stamina and fielding these cannot be less than six each. Preferably they should be higher than twelve. Often coaches are required to make compromises here and early on that’s ok. As your team progresses however coaches should be more discerning.

Whilst potential is important a players starting skill is also important. In Stumped player skills slowly decline each week. This decline increases with age. Player skill improves when they play matches or when they train. Because of this structure many players who have low starting ability will simply never reach their potential unless that potential is very low. A good general rule is to avoid players with a starting ability of less than four.

After reading this you will now understand that the majority of your initial squad is practically useless. You will likely have a few players who are somewhat trainable and or somewhat useful. This is ok. Everyone starts out like this.

Select the nine players which have the highest potential and assign them to the relevant coach training them in a relevant skill. On the coaching tab there is a system which illustrates specific players training speeds. The more stars the faster they train. This can be used to assist with decision making on specific players. If there is a choice between training two players it is usually better to train the younger player.


The Initial First Eleven

Once you have selected your trainees it’s time to pick your starting eleven. Be sure to pick the players you are training to maximise the increase in their skills. Select two other players to pad out your starting eleven. You are ready to go. This is the eleven which will play all of your matches.

The team should contain players who are less than twenty-two years of age. This is so that your squad will be able to play all three matches. Players cannot play DEV matches once they turn twenty-two. Playing all three matches will help them improve their skills a s fast as possible.

Unfortunately, it’s unlikely that you will be able to have all players playing in every match. This is because of condition. Players lose condition when playing a match. Each day players gain condition. The amount they gain is dependent on stamina.
When selecting the team for each match be sure to check your players condition. Consistently selecting players with low condition will lead to an injury and that will hurt player performance and long term development. If a player has a condition of less than sixty percent on the day of the match, swap him out for a player in your second eleven.


Improving Your Team

Whist your initial squad usually isn’t great the situation is usually quite easily rectified. There are two ways to do this. The first of them is through your club’s scouts. Every Wednesday you select from a list of five young hopefuls. Be warned that the batting and bowling averages provided are not always an accurate indicator of a player’s usefulness.

If the player selected has a potential of thirty-seven or greater that’s awesome! Assign them a coach and add them to your first team. Obviously the least promising of your existing trainees/players misses out and is removed from their trainer and loses their spot in the first eleven.

Meanwhile new coaches should explore the transfer market. Look for players in the 37 to 43 potential bracket. They must be sixteen. These can usually be picked up fairly cheaply. Do not spend more than twenty thousand on any one player. Try to spend less than ten thousand.

Between your youth scouts and the transfer market it should take you about a month to fill all nine training slots with players who are younger than twenty-two and with a potential of higher than thirty-seven. Ensure your squad is no larger than eighteen. Sell or fire any unnecessary players. Next comes the hard part. The waiting.

Monitor your player’s development. Resist the urge to ‘upgrade’ your existing trainees. One or two points of potential isn’t going to make a huge difference to your team. The really good players, those in the forty-four and above bracket are rarely on the market and always go for three million plus. It’s better to save for one of these players. They will make a difference.

When a player nears their potential stop training them. A good rule of thumb is to stop training once all three key skills are within one of their potential. The rate of skill decline is quite steep when a player reaches their potential. Even playing two games a week will not stop the decline once a player reaches around twenty-two particularly if the player’s skill and potential are high.


Improving Your Club

The last remaining considerations are the training of your coaches and ground staff along with the development of your ground. With regards to the ground size exercise caution. An expansion should be for no more than two thousand seats at a time.

With regards to the ground staff its very much a matter of personal choice. If preparing a specific pitch is important to you then some training is beneficial. Bear in mind though that you will require a fairly versatile squad if you are to make use of a variable home wickets.

Coaches on the other hand are well worth developing. Again though there are no hard and fast rules. One specialist batting and one bowling coach seems the norm. Training one of your coaches every other week is a reasonable way to increase coaching skill without compromising existing training too much.


Concluding Thoughts

As your team develops and finances permit you will develop good players. As a general rule most team’s youth scouts manage to find one useful player a season. Your team will get better but this will take time. Remaining patient is the key.

I haven’t really touched on tactical considerations here. That is because the subject would be an article in itself. I’d encourage new coaches to experiment. Should you stay and enjoy the game you will not remember the early losses but the knowledge gained will stay with you.

As a final note I’d encourage new players to get active on the forums. Games like this succeed because people become invested in them. When on the forums always try to balance any criticisms you might make of the developers. Understand that they don’t owe you anything and developing these kinds of products is a difficult and often thankless task.

Lunarlord34
Posts: 2866
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2016 12:30 am

Re: Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Postby Lunarlord34 » Fri Nov 18, 2016 2:26 pm

Bloody awesome guide Rosewarne. Hell I think I learnt a bit by reading it XD (Also realised how many mistakes I made early on >.>) Was this where you disappeared to? ;)
If you couldn't guess I am all behind this guide. It's pretty tough starting off as a new team 11/12 Seasons in when there are some very good, well established sides monopolizing the market (you lot know who you are)

rtj45
Posts: 4608
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2016 12:31 am
Location: Dorset

Re: Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Postby rtj45 » Fri Nov 18, 2016 2:39 pm

Lunarlord34 wrote:Bloody awesome guide Rosewarne. Hell I think I learnt a bit by reading it XD (Also realised how many mistakes I made early on >.>) Was this where you disappeared to? ;)
If you couldn't guess I am all behind this guide. It's pretty tough starting off as a new team 11/12 Seasons in when there are some very good, well established sides monopolizing the market (you lot know who you are)


No idea what you are on about mate.
Manager of West Row Wyverns and affiliate East Row Eagles
Winner of the grand slam in season 13 (Dev, T20, SOD, Cup, International)

Lunarlord34
Posts: 2866
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2016 12:30 am

Re: Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Postby Lunarlord34 » Fri Nov 18, 2016 2:56 pm

rtj45 wrote:
Lunarlord34 wrote:Bloody awesome guide Rosewarne. Hell I think I learnt a bit by reading it XD (Also realised how many mistakes I made early on >.>) Was this where you disappeared to? ;)
If you couldn't guess I am all behind this guide. It's pretty tough starting off as a new team 11/12 Seasons in when there are some very good, well established sides monopolizing the market (you lot know who you are)


No idea what you are on about mate.

:ugeek: :think: :angel: :thumbup:

Loch99

Re: Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Postby Loch99 » Fri Nov 18, 2016 3:22 pm

Rosewarne wrote: A tough batting wicket often results in a shorter ‘shoot out’ style of game where the team that manages to put together just one effective partnership wins. The shorter game can reduce the training your players receive for playing the match and this can hamper their development. That in turn can hamper your teams long term prospects.

Kudos to Rosewarne for putting this guide together.

1 Question though; I am wondering about how experience and in-game training works, I am under the impression that any batsman who faces at least a single delivery receives identical levels of in-game batting training. Anyone who bowls a delivery - bowling training. Every player receives fielding and experience. Wicketkeeping and Captaincy for respective players. Also no matter how long the game goes on, ie bowled out, in-game training levels remain unchanged.

Correct me if I'm wrong, I'd like to learn how in-game training works.

Lunarlord34
Posts: 2866
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2016 12:30 am

Re: Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Postby Lunarlord34 » Fri Nov 18, 2016 9:47 pm

Loch99 wrote:
Rosewarne wrote: A tough batting wicket often results in a shorter ‘shoot out’ style of game where the team that manages to put together just one effective partnership wins. The shorter game can reduce the training your players receive for playing the match and this can hamper their development. That in turn can hamper your teams long term prospects.

Kudos to Rosewarne for putting this guide together.

1 Question though; I am wondering about how experience and in-game training works, I am under the impression that any batsman who faces at least a single delivery receives identical levels of in-game batting training. Anyone who bowls a delivery - bowling training. Every player receives fielding and experience. Wicketkeeping and Captaincy for respective players. Also no matter how long the game goes on, ie bowled out, in-game training levels remain unchanged.

Correct me if I'm wrong, I'd like to learn how in-game training works.

Correct on most parts. Face one ball = max training for that match.
Wicketkeeping not too sure if its the entire match = max training or simply being selected, same with fielding. Maybe someone else can clarify? But pretty sure it's just being selected.
Captaincy pretty sure is just being named as captain you get training for it. Pretty sure how long the match goes on for has no effect, same with experience (though I think higher divisions = more experience training. Could be wrong)
For bowling it's how many overs, though I'm sure it isn't linear. E.g. One over in an SOD match isn't 10% of training, I think its more like 20%. But five overs might be 70%, 9 overs 96% sort of thing. Not entirely sure of the formula it was, but pretty much the first five overs of an SOD spell are worth more than the last five. (Same as first four in a dev and first two in a T20)
So if you bowl 40/50 overs you do miss out on ten overs of bowling training, but assuming you don't have two new bowlers bowling those last ten they not as important in bowling training (of course the extra overs help)

SM-xmarra
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Re: Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Postby SM-xmarra » Sat Nov 19, 2016 12:04 am

As someone who's just completed a full season this is very good. Wish i had something like this when i started.

Will be using some of guidelines around groundstaff and covers as totally forgot about it after getting in grossed in developing my youth players!
Manager of Durham Elite, Wearside Lankans & New Zealand

Winners of SOD 1.1, season 16, 17 & 21
Winner of T20 1.1 season 21 & 24

Winner of International T20 - Season 12 & 22
Runner up of International SOD - Season 17

Rosewarne

Re: Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Postby Rosewarne » Sat Nov 19, 2016 5:18 am

Lunarlord34 wrote:Bloody awesome guide Rosewarne. Hell I think I learnt a bit by reading it XD (Also realised how many mistakes I made early on >.>) Was this where you disappeared to? ;)
If you couldn't guess I am all behind this guide. It's pretty tough starting off as a new team 11/12 Seasons in when there are some very good, well established sides monopolizing the market (you lot know who you are)


Cheers for the kind words Lunar

I just needed a break for a bit. the season ten debacle really hurt my team. I demoted when I shouldn't have, lost a key player I had purchased and I lost a 16 year old with 52 bowling Potential and 44 batting potential. Starting skills were both in the mid twenties. He would have been a TOTAL god.

So I sold most of my first team and started again. I expect I'll be knocking on the door of 1.1 again in two seasons. Rebuild is almost done. Was unlucky to demote again last season after winning seven games. Having said that winning seven games in the two's with a top order with three 16 years old's gives some indication of their talent.

Match wrap will also be back :)

DEV-R0b1et
Site Admin
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Re: Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Postby DEV-R0b1et » Fri Feb 03, 2017 5:17 pm

Rosewarne wrote:[excellent post]


I've stickied this thread. It would be nice if Rosewarne was to manage it, so that if people want to add to the information he can place it into the first post. And the end can be neatend up - I could even see if it's possible to give Rosewarne admin for the thread to delete actioned posts.

Lunarlord34
Posts: 2866
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2016 12:30 am

Re: Rosewarne’s Stumped New Player Guide

Postby Lunarlord34 » Fri Feb 03, 2017 11:57 pm

As an expansion, for ticket prices working out the price per league is very, very simple maths.
For away games, times what you got by four. Then divide by the amount in attendence. That is the price per ticket in your division.
Or if you're using a home game to get the answer? Also simple. Times the amount you earnt by four, then divide by three and then divide whatever your answer is by the attendence once again.
Now when I say attendence, I don't mean the max attendence. But the attendence who are...well attending the game :lol:
The higher the division you play, the more money you earn.
For cup games, you get half. So times whatever you got by two then divide by once again attendance. Pretty sure these prices change per round, so round one might be $2 a ticket let's say but round 2 might be $2.50 a ticket.
Ticket prices will be a constant, the only thing which will defer is attendence.


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